Book suggestions?

Have just decided I’ve not read a bit epic fantasy in a while and I don’t seem to have any in my flat I’ve not already read. Browsing Amazon, I still can’t find one I’m inspired to read and is in a format small enough to read on the tube so has anyone got any suggestions?

52 thoughts on “Book suggestions?

  1. Have you tried Scott Bakker’s Prince of Nothing trilogy? Otherwise I can rec Daniel Abraham’s Long Price Quartet (the mmpb of the first two books in omnibus should be out from Orbit soon-ish). JV Jones’ Sword of Shadows is pretty good but I haven’t caught up with the latest volume yet. David Gemmell’s Troy Trilogy and Paul Kearney’s stand-alone The Ten Thousand are also pretty smart.

    1. I’ve read the first two Bakker and am undecided whether I want to continue – writing’s good but eh main character’s so soulless I find myself losing interest.

      Haven’t read any Daniel Abraham or J V Jones so I shall have to investigate there – I read Kearney’s first of the Sea Beggers and didn’t care for it much – am thinking maybe I should read some more Gemmell though, being long-listed for a Gemmell insipired award!

      Thanks for the suggestions!

      1. Daniel Abraham is indeed pretty decent.

        There’s always stuff that – not wanting to sound too harsh – doesn’t push many boundaries. Recently, I’ve read Brian Ruckley, Greg Keyes, and I read something called I think “The Amber Wizard” by David Forbes but I think it was US import. Stuff I read quite a while back, try Jim Butcher, he’s got a series of 3-4 that goes “[Something’s] Fury”. James Barclay did a duology “Cry Of The Newborn” and “Shout For The Dead”. There’s also a series by James Clemens (apparently the fantasy alter-ego name of James Rollins, who writes Dan Brownish fiction), called “The Godslayer Chronicles”.

        I think Ruckley is the pick of that bunch, although I’d expect they should all pass the time okay at worst.

        1. Yeah, I’m thinking Brian Ruckley will have to happen soon. Am fine with stuff that doesn’t push the boundaries, if the book works for me then I’m happy to read it however derivative. Grey Keyes I enjoyed the first two sufficiently, I just don’t feel inspired to read no 3 but can’t actually think of a good reason why not!

          I really liked his Waterborn duology and used some of his ideas there for the gods of the Twilight Reign, but his epic fantasy just didn’t smack me over the head the way something like Sum of All Men did. Not that I’ve actually read the last one in that series yet…

          It is interesting to go through lists of authors like this and think about what I want to read, then apply it to my ideas for future novels! Have to remind myself that it’s only a good idea if I myself would pick up the book!

  2. Have you tried Scott Bakker’s Prince of Nothing trilogy? Otherwise I can rec Daniel Abraham’s Long Price Quartet (the mmpb of the first two books in omnibus should be out from Orbit soon-ish). JV Jones’ Sword of Shadows is pretty good but I haven’t caught up with the latest volume yet. David Gemmell’s Troy Trilogy and Paul Kearney’s stand-alone The Ten Thousand are also pretty smart.

    1. I’ve read the first two Bakker and am undecided whether I want to continue – writing’s good but eh main character’s so soulless I find myself losing interest.

      Haven’t read any Daniel Abraham or J V Jones so I shall have to investigate there – I read Kearney’s first of the Sea Beggers and didn’t care for it much – am thinking maybe I should read some more Gemmell though, being long-listed for a Gemmell insipired award!

      Thanks for the suggestions!

      1. Daniel Abraham is indeed pretty decent.

        There’s always stuff that – not wanting to sound too harsh – doesn’t push many boundaries. Recently, I’ve read Brian Ruckley, Greg Keyes, and I read something called I think “The Amber Wizard” by David Forbes but I think it was US import. Stuff I read quite a while back, try Jim Butcher, he’s got a series of 3-4 that goes “[Something’s] Fury”. James Barclay did a duology “Cry Of The Newborn” and “Shout For The Dead”. There’s also a series by James Clemens (apparently the fantasy alter-ego name of James Rollins, who writes Dan Brownish fiction), called “The Godslayer Chronicles”.

        I think Ruckley is the pick of that bunch, although I’d expect they should all pass the time okay at worst.

        1. Yeah, I’m thinking Brian Ruckley will have to happen soon. Am fine with stuff that doesn’t push the boundaries, if the book works for me then I’m happy to read it however derivative. Grey Keyes I enjoyed the first two sufficiently, I just don’t feel inspired to read no 3 but can’t actually think of a good reason why not!

          I really liked his Waterborn duology and used some of his ideas there for the gods of the Twilight Reign, but his epic fantasy just didn’t smack me over the head the way something like Sum of All Men did. Not that I’ve actually read the last one in that series yet…

          It is interesting to go through lists of authors like this and think about what I want to read, then apply it to my ideas for future novels! Have to remind myself that it’s only a good idea if I myself would pick up the book!

  3. epic fantasy

    Best epic fantasy I read this year: ACACIA by David Anthony Durham. Not his first novel — he’s written several historical novels previously — but the first in what will presumably be a fantasy series. Seriously good — stands comparison to George R.R. Martin.

    Daniel Abraham is good, too. And yes, you should definitely read Brian Ruckley.

    But if you want small, lightweight books to carry on the tube, maybe you should consider another genre… a slim volume of verse, perchance?

    1. Re: epic fantasy

      Ah, Think I’ve been thinking Daniel Abraham and David Durham were the same person… should probably pay more attention clearly!

      Doesn’t Durham have no respect for fantasy authors in general? Vaguely remember some catty comments about the geeky breed in general.

      On the format size, as long as it’s a B-format I’m happy, but the latest Erikson is only out in hardback and those hurt to read on the tube if I have to hold on with my other hand, similarly the Neal Stephenson proof I’ve got!

      1. Re: epic fantasy

        [quote]Doesn’t Durham have no respect for fantasy authors in general? Vaguely remember some catty comments about the geeky breed in general.[/quote]

        I highly doubt that. From his Blog:

        [quote]Day Two I went to plenty panels and readings, and by the end of it I was hanging out with George RR Martin (he’d read Pride of Carthage since last we met!), Steven Erikson (and lovely wife, who kept saying things to intentionally embarrass me), Daniel Abraham (I went to his reading; he came to mine in return; kinda nicely reciprocal), Dave Keck and my British editor, Simon Taylor. Did I say “hanging out”? I did, didn’t I? And I mean it. Strange but true, these folks seem like… well, like friends. I guess that’s part of the con magic.[/quote]

        World Fantasy 08
        http://www.davidanthonydurham.com/blog/2008/11/world-fantasy-2008.html

  4. epic fantasy

    Best epic fantasy I read this year: ACACIA by David Anthony Durham. Not his first novel — he’s written several historical novels previously — but the first in what will presumably be a fantasy series. Seriously good — stands comparison to George R.R. Martin.

    Daniel Abraham is good, too. And yes, you should definitely read Brian Ruckley.

    But if you want small, lightweight books to carry on the tube, maybe you should consider another genre… a slim volume of verse, perchance?

    1. Re: epic fantasy

      Ah, Think I’ve been thinking Daniel Abraham and David Durham were the same person… should probably pay more attention clearly!

      Doesn’t Durham have no respect for fantasy authors in general? Vaguely remember some catty comments about the geeky breed in general.

      On the format size, as long as it’s a B-format I’m happy, but the latest Erikson is only out in hardback and those hurt to read on the tube if I have to hold on with my other hand, similarly the Neal Stephenson proof I’ve got!

      1. Re: epic fantasy

        [quote]Doesn’t Durham have no respect for fantasy authors in general? Vaguely remember some catty comments about the geeky breed in general.[/quote]

        I highly doubt that. From his Blog:

        [quote]Day Two I went to plenty panels and readings, and by the end of it I was hanging out with George RR Martin (he’d read Pride of Carthage since last we met!), Steven Erikson (and lovely wife, who kept saying things to intentionally embarrass me), Daniel Abraham (I went to his reading; he came to mine in return; kinda nicely reciprocal), Dave Keck and my British editor, Simon Taylor. Did I say “hanging out”? I did, didn’t I? And I mean it. Strange but true, these folks seem like… well, like friends. I guess that’s part of the con magic.[/quote]

        World Fantasy 08
        http://www.davidanthonydurham.com/blog/2008/11/world-fantasy-2008.html

    1. Re: RE:book suggestion

      Have read the Runelords, the first three anyway. The first two were very good, but I thought he lost his way in book 3 – can you tell me what book four is like?

    1. Re: RE:book suggestion

      Have read the Runelords, the first three anyway. The first two were very good, but I thought he lost his way in book 3 – can you tell me what book four is like?

  5. Vicious, world building, but a little… anticlimactic.

    Until you read book 5 ;)

    Books 3 and 4 I admit, slowed down a little (though 4 is a big improvement over 3) but there is some pretty darn good fights and some serious focus on raj athen, Borrison and Myrimma with all the goodness of Gaborn kicking arse.

    It did feel a little anticlimactic however, until I started book 5… Now everything is starting to click :D

    (Arklite from the forums by the by ;) )

  6. Vicious, world building, but a little… anticlimactic.

    Until you read book 5 ;)

    Books 3 and 4 I admit, slowed down a little (though 4 is a big improvement over 3) but there is some pretty darn good fights and some serious focus on raj athen, Borrison and Myrimma with all the goodness of Gaborn kicking arse.

    It did feel a little anticlimactic however, until I started book 5… Now everything is starting to click :D

    (Arklite from the forums by the by ;) )

  7. If you like Erikson (and I know you do!) then you need to give Glen Cook’s ‘Black Company’ books a go. If it wasn’t for the Black Company there would be no Bridgeburners, simple as that.
    If you want to get hold of a free copy then it’s published by Gollancz over here. It’s a hefty book though (first three books collected in one volume) so you might want to consider getting the individual copies that (I think) Tor still do.

    Graeme

    1. Try Name of The Wind by Patrick Rothfuss;it’s out in paperback,and it’s pretty damned good.Alternatives include The Painted Man by Peter V. Brett(Published as The Warded Man in the US) and Way of Shadows by B.Weeks.

      1. I’ve read Name of the Wind, which was good but I didn’t feel it was as good as most people seemed to think. Will investigate the other two though, I’ve not even heard of the second one so thanks!

  8. If you like Erikson (and I know you do!) then you need to give Glen Cook’s ‘Black Company’ books a go. If it wasn’t for the Black Company there would be no Bridgeburners, simple as that.
    If you want to get hold of a free copy then it’s published by Gollancz over here. It’s a hefty book though (first three books collected in one volume) so you might want to consider getting the individual copies that (I think) Tor still do.

    Graeme

    1. Try Name of The Wind by Patrick Rothfuss;it’s out in paperback,and it’s pretty damned good.Alternatives include The Painted Man by Peter V. Brett(Published as The Warded Man in the US) and Way of Shadows by B.Weeks.

      1. I’ve read Name of the Wind, which was good but I didn’t feel it was as good as most people seemed to think. Will investigate the other two though, I’ve not even heard of the second one so thanks!

  9. books to look into

    Some Authers that might intrest you i would have to suggest.
    Terry Goodkind, David Eddings, Mercedes Lackey, E.E. Knight, Elizebeth Kerner, and Meliane Rawn. Hope you enjoy!

  10. books to look into

    Some Authers that might intrest you i would have to suggest.
    Terry Goodkind, David Eddings, Mercedes Lackey, E.E. Knight, Elizebeth Kerner, and Meliane Rawn. Hope you enjoy!

  11. books

    Have you read Guy Gavriel Kay? I’ve read a part of Tigana – not finished because time escaped me. He has an interesting take on life, but his ability to build a scene is magical. I can’t say whether the promise of the opening is lived up to – but worth a try perhaps. You can only get it second-hand or I found mine at the library (that was why it was unfinished – took it back with the children’s! It was a special book and I was terrified of spilling tea on it.)

    C.S.Friedman – the Black Sun Rising has an anti-hero feel to it, been a long time since I read it though.

    Robin Hobb – the Liveship trilogy – of course – but that has quite a feminine slant.

    K.J.Parker gets my prize for the most perfect opening ever! Again I have to say I didn’t get beyond the third – but with 3 children I’m easily distracted at the moment.

    And a book that needs no effort – just admiration – is stardust. Lovely. Comfort food in book form!

    A.

    1. Re: books

      Guy Gavriel Kay remains one of those writers I really should have read and keep forgetting to, so maybe this it the time! Have read a few Robin Hobb and KJ Parker and for some reason I don’t feel inspired to read more. Esp Parker, I don’t know what it is cos the blurbs are always things that I want to read about but something about the style just doesn’t suit. Which is annoying because the books are so interesting-sounding. Mind you, I saw The Company got a five star review in SFX so that could be worth a look.

  12. books

    Have you read Guy Gavriel Kay? I’ve read a part of Tigana – not finished because time escaped me. He has an interesting take on life, but his ability to build a scene is magical. I can’t say whether the promise of the opening is lived up to – but worth a try perhaps. You can only get it second-hand or I found mine at the library (that was why it was unfinished – took it back with the children’s! It was a special book and I was terrified of spilling tea on it.)

    C.S.Friedman – the Black Sun Rising has an anti-hero feel to it, been a long time since I read it though.

    Robin Hobb – the Liveship trilogy – of course – but that has quite a feminine slant.

    K.J.Parker gets my prize for the most perfect opening ever! Again I have to say I didn’t get beyond the third – but with 3 children I’m easily distracted at the moment.

    And a book that needs no effort – just admiration – is stardust. Lovely. Comfort food in book form!

    A.

    1. Re: books

      Guy Gavriel Kay remains one of those writers I really should have read and keep forgetting to, so maybe this it the time! Have read a few Robin Hobb and KJ Parker and for some reason I don’t feel inspired to read more. Esp Parker, I don’t know what it is cos the blurbs are always things that I want to read about but something about the style just doesn’t suit. Which is annoying because the books are so interesting-sounding. Mind you, I saw The Company got a five star review in SFX so that could be worth a look.

  13. books

    P.S. Have you tried Juliet McKenna? For sheer ability to take the genre, tip it on its side, give it a kick or two, pick it up and dust it off – she’s your man. (She gave a seminar at Winchester, an intelligent, wise and funny woman who gave me a greater understanding of the genre and industry than any of the books I’ve trawled through and I’ve trawled through many!) Actually I didn’t like the one I read. Her hero was so ‘anti’ I wanted to throw the book across the room (well him really) – but you might like that. (Perhaps it was intentional on her part?!?)

    Then there is that Tom Lloyd bloke. His work is dark and heavy with the ability to build a scene that borders on the fantastical. Gets in early, and leaves late (contrary to all popular opinion) combining tension, prescience and momentum. Wow, totally addictive.

    A.

    (Sorry I was a teacher in a former life – I have to praise when it is appropriate.)(Prescience – is that the right word? Fate.)

    1. Re: books

      ;0) I like that, if only my English teachers, actually any of my teachers, had been so complimentary!

      Juliet McKenna eh? Right, another one for the to-buy list.

  14. books

    P.S. Have you tried Juliet McKenna? For sheer ability to take the genre, tip it on its side, give it a kick or two, pick it up and dust it off – she’s your man. (She gave a seminar at Winchester, an intelligent, wise and funny woman who gave me a greater understanding of the genre and industry than any of the books I’ve trawled through and I’ve trawled through many!) Actually I didn’t like the one I read. Her hero was so ‘anti’ I wanted to throw the book across the room (well him really) – but you might like that. (Perhaps it was intentional on her part?!?)

    Then there is that Tom Lloyd bloke. His work is dark and heavy with the ability to build a scene that borders on the fantastical. Gets in early, and leaves late (contrary to all popular opinion) combining tension, prescience and momentum. Wow, totally addictive.

    A.

    (Sorry I was a teacher in a former life – I have to praise when it is appropriate.)(Prescience – is that the right word? Fate.)

    1. Re: books

      ;0) I like that, if only my English teachers, actually any of my teachers, had been so complimentary!

      Juliet McKenna eh? Right, another one for the to-buy list.

  15. Recommended reading

    I think it’s also been suggested by another contributor, but can definitely suggest you’re on the right path with Brent Weeks’ Night Angel trilogy. Can’t go wrong there really.

    There, now it’s said. Bring on your incisive commentary once you’ve read it!

  16. Recommended reading

    I think it’s also been suggested by another contributor, but can definitely suggest you’re on the right path with Brent Weeks’ Night Angel trilogy. Can’t go wrong there really.

    There, now it’s said. Bring on your incisive commentary once you’ve read it!

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